Polis Research Blog

Political scientists at Duke University draw upon a variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches to produce cutting-edge research that enhances our understanding of politics. Polis is committed to showcasing political science research at Duke and to facilitating its creation.

All Research & Media Hits

Professor McCorkle on the New NC Government, The Chronicle

Professor McCorkle on the New NC Government, The Chronicle Professor McCorkle has been quoted in The Chronicle on the newly-elected NC state government. He discussed the possibility of Republicans in the House overriding a veto and major policy implications from GOP wins in the legislature. These include a potential “Parent’s Bill of Right’s,” anti-critical race theory legislation, private school voucher programs, gerrymandering and medicaid expansion. McCorkle argues that abortion will be the “biggest test for the Republicans” as restrictions are “more than a distinct possibility.” However, disagreements within the Republican party may arise from those who would want a total... Continue reading

Polis Student Committee Press Briefing on 2022 Midterm Election

Polis Student Committee Press Briefing on 2022 Midterm Elections Directly following a Duke faculty Midterm Election briefing, 6 Polis Student Committee (PSC) members were interviewed by international journalists through the organization of the State Department. PSC panelists included Chloe Decker (PPS ‘25) of the NC Young People’s Alliance; James Gao (PPS ’24) of Duke Dem’s; Pilar Kelly (PPS ’24) of Duke Votes; Ishanvi Malayanil (PPS ‘26) a women’s rights activist who has spoken at UN Women; Jaquell Sneed-Adams (MPP ‘23), Research Assistant for Polis / PolicyLab Fellows Duke Political History Project; and Jordan Wilson (MPP ‘24) of Policy in Living Color.... Continue reading

Faculty Press Briefing on 2022 Midterm Election

Duke Faculty Press Briefing on 2022 Midterm Elections Following the 2022 Midterm Elections, Duke faculty spoke at a press briefing open to media and the public at the Sanford School of Public Policy. Panelists included Kerry Haynie, professor of political science at Trinity College of Arts and Sciences; Asher Hildebrand, associate professor of the practice in the Sanford School of Public Policy; Adriane Lentz-Smith, professor in the department of history; and Pope “Mac” McCorkle, professor of the practice in the Sanford School of Public Policy. They discussed the lack of a true “red wave,” concerns over democracy, the role of... Continue reading

Kennedy Jones (PPS ‘24): “A New Blue Wave — Expanding Rural Political Engagement”

Imagine you’re an Ohioan trying to decide who to vote for in an important election. One candidate says “We’re going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business.” — an important industry in your state and the whole Appalachian region. To that, the other candidate responds — “These are amazing people. And it’s not going to happen.” You might remember that the first candidate was Hillary Clinton during the 2016 Presidential Election, and the second Donald Trump. Continue reading

Andrew Touma (PPS ‘24): “Medical Debtors Got Some Help — But More Needs to be Done”

Three of the nation’s largest credit bureaus announced changes to how medical debt will impact credit scores. Starting in July, unpaid medical collections will not impact one’s credit score until a full year has passed, up from the previous standard of six months. Additionally, medical debts under $500 will not appear on credit reports starting in 2023. While significant, the new benchmark can be reversed at any instant, meaning it is up to policymakers to enshrine these new standards into law. Continue reading